Without talking about tech?

After my enthusiastic and bold message to my boss during Ewan McIntosh’s keynote (thanks to lisibo for the reflections and great sketchnotes!) at Practical Pedagogies in Toulouse I have been preparing to meet with him to start making that dent.

My role is to embed technology in learning across the academy chain, however I am coming to the conclusion this is best achieved by not talking about the technology (or at least as little as possible). Conversations about learning, independent learning, sharing and collaboration have been more effective in moving the use of technology forward in an effective way.

Hence, if my colleagues are creating innovative ideas and looking to make them happen, technology that supports learning will follow.

“How might we raise the aspirations of our children?”

“How might we shared best practice across our schools?”

“How might we assess without levels?”

“How might we connect with other cultures?”

“How might we support our local community?”

These are learning based problems that can have a technology aspect in their solutions but technology is not the solution alone. I often refer to a former colleague who was/is a self-confessed “techno-phobe” and nervous of my #edtech role. However, one lunch in the canteen she idly mentioned whatsapp, which she was merrily using on her new iphone. The technology gave her no worries or concerns…. Why? Because it allowed her to view endless pictures of her beautiful granddaughter. It solved a problem and enhanced her experience of being a new grandmother.

The design thinking process seems to be an ideal tool for identifying problems and developing ideas so I want to try and begin to introduce it to my organisation.

IMG_20151029_224921Part of this process has been re-reading Ewan’s book “How to Come Up with Great Ideas… and actually make them happen”. It is a fascinating combination of Ewan’s experience and a journey through the design thinking process. The aspects I have picked up in particular are ideas about trying to move excellence out of individual classrooms, how meetings do not support innovation and looking to define problems, great problems that can lead to great ideas. I have used a lot of post-its, though this seems to be a big part of design thinking!

The key ideas I want to get across are:

  • Help us immerse in our schools and look at the details (avoiding doing what we have always done)
  • Valuing people and their ideas (design thinking gives us a way to get the best ideas from our colleagues)
  • Make our organisation innovative and focussed on learning (Make the big thing, The big thing)
  • Schools can remain individual and autonomous while having a common language for creating innovation across the academies (A key vision of our Multi-academy Trust, MAT)
  • Subtle was of getting everyone utilising technology effectively (Evolving Edtech maybe?)

It feels fuzzy but I am assured this is how all great ideas should feel at the beginning. However, fuzzy doesn’t always allow people to buy-in.

The practical things I am asking for are

  • A notebook for a team/teams to write a bug list and ideas wallet
  • A room to display the immersion of our core team in our schools
  • Lots of post-its
  • Permission to form a project team that represents out entire organisation

My next post may be my last if I cannot convey the impact I think design thinking could have on our organisation.

Watch this space

Ben

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One thought on “How might we… Evolve #Edtech

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